Elections

Legislators use timing and creative wording to skirt spirit of fundraising rules

Legislators use timing and creative wording to skirt spirit of fundraising rules

This examination of campaign records and fundraising techniques shows how Maine statehouse politicians have found creative ways ways to skirt the spirit of laws meant to limit the influence of special interests. How do they do it: by scheduling events on dates and times that don’t violate the letter of the law. They do it by choosing how they word an invitation, avoiding words that might get them in trouble, like “host,” and instead using a safe term like “featured guest.”

Lawmaker: PACs shouldn’t pay the legislators who run them

Lawmaker: PACs shouldn’t pay the legislators who run them

Saying he wanted to stop a practice that was “the closest thing to getting directly paid” by lobbyists, state Rep. Louis Luchini, D-Ellsworth, introduced a bill Feb. 27 to bar legislators from paying themselves, businesses they run and family members from political action committees (PACs) that they control.

Portland primary election challenges lead to proposed changes in campaign law

The Maine Ethics Commission has fined losing Senate candidate Rep. Diane Russell $500 for failing to disclose her contribution to her Senate campaign of a valuable email list, closing the books on a series of ethics complaints generated by the recent Portland Democratic Senate primary. But the complaints — two against Russell and one against primary winner Rep. Ben Chipman — may end up having a broader effect on Maine campaign-finance law and how elections are run.