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CORONAVIRUS, HEALTH, POLITICS, TRANSPARENCY

State prepares arenas for next wave of coronavirus patients

Indigent Defense
CORONAVIRUS
While Maine struggles to obtain enough personal protective equipment for healthcare workers and supplies to provide critical care, the state must now grapple with a new concern as the spread of the coronavirus accelerates: where to move the sick when hospital beds fill up.

A single 250-bed federal medical station is all Maine has to expand its hospital capacity statewide, Pine Tree Watch has confirmed with the Maine Emergency Management Agency. Used in New York following Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the second-hand medical station has no medical supplies and only limited durable medical equipment, including cots and hand-washing stations, yet it will be the backbone of the next phase of Maine’s response to the virus.

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention intends to divide the medical station into 50-bed “modules” to be set up as alternate care sites to avoid overwhelming hospitals, Maine CDC head Dr. Nirav Shah said. The state will set up the first 150 beds at arena or auditorium-type facilities by next week.

“I hope we never need to use these sites, but we cannot afford to wait to find out. Building them now will ensure that if the need does arise, we will be prepared and Maine people will be cared for and Maine people will survive,” said Gov. Janet Mills on Tuesday during a joint press conference with the Maine CDC.

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Top Stories

The Maine Trust Project

Maine Trust Project: Amanda Huotari

INSTALLMENT 20: OWEN LOGUE

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In our mistrust-filled world full of political contention and both fake and devastating news, mustering the courage to have authentic conversations with people can be a challenge. Finding common ground and engaging in civil discourse about important issues facing our communities, our state, our country and our world can seem elusive, if not sadly impossible.

This concerning state of affairs prompted Pine Tree Watch to examine the concept of trust. In this series called “The Maine Trust Project,” we sit down each month with a Maine resident to discuss this precious commodity. We’ll see which people and institutions Mainers trust and how the concept of trust drives their thought processes and actions.

Get to Know Owen Logue

Maine Trust Project: Amanda Huotari

INSTALLMENT 19: ANN RIVERS

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In our mistrust-filled world full of political contention and both fake and devastating news, mustering the courage to have authentic conversations with people can be a challenge. Finding common ground and engaging in civil discourse about important issues facing our communities, our state, our country and our world can seem elusive, if not sadly impossible.

This concerning state of affairs prompted Pine Tree Watch to examine the concept of trust. In this series called “The Maine Trust Project,” we sit down each month with a Maine resident to discuss this precious commodity. We’ll see which people and institutions Mainers trust and how the concept of trust drives their thought processes and actions.

Get to Know Ann Rivers

Maine Trust Project: Joseph Reagan

INSTALLMENT 18: MICHAEL BURMAN

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Michael Burman is a neuroscientist and an associate professor of psychology at the University of New England in Biddeford, teaching his students that their sensory experiences are not trustworthy.

A simple way to wrap your head around that concept is to think about visual illusions that trick the brain, such as the three lines with arrow heads that each have a different orientation, making the lines look like they’re different lengths, when they really aren’t.

Get to Know Michael Burman

Maine Trust Project: Myron M. Beasley

INSTALLMENT 17: RUSS MURLEY

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In early November, Russ Murley and a friend went hiking on a trail that is no longer included on trail maps, but the two experienced rock climbers knew about it and felt comfortable on it.

They climbed through boulder fields and finally found themselves facing a 25-foot vertical wall of rock. A previous hiker had left a fixed rope in the rock face. It looked safe to use, so Russ’ friend grabbed hold and climbed up with no troubles. But when Russ took the rope in his hand and he confronted his next move – swinging by that rope across the rock to find his first foothold – he froze.

Get to Know Russ Murley

Maine Trust Project: Marie Harnois of Jackman

INSTALLMENT 16: SHERI OLDHAM

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In our mistrust-filled world full of political contention and both fake and devastating news, mustering the courage to have authentic conversations with people can be a challenge. Finding common ground and engaging in civil discourse about important issues facing our communities, our state, our country and our world can seem elusive, if not sadly impossible.

This concerning state of affairs prompted Pine Tree Watch to examine the concept of trust. In this series called “The Maine Trust Project,” we sit down each month with a Maine resident to discuss this precious commodity. We’ll see which people and institutions Mainers trust and how the concept of trust drives their thought processes and actions.

Get to Know Sheri Oldham
Maine Trust Project: Joe Black of Bath

INSTALLMENT 15: INNA BEZBORODKO

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In our mistrust-filled world full of political contention and both fake and devastating news, mustering the courage to have authentic conversations with people can be a challenge. Finding common ground and engaging in civil discourse about important issues facing our communities, our state, our country and our world can seem elusive, if not sadly impossible.

This concerning state of affairs prompted Pine Tree Watch to examine the concept of trust. In this series called “The Maine Trust Project,” we sit down each month with a Maine resident to discuss this precious commodity. We’ll see which people and institutions Mainers trust and how the concept of trust drives their thought processes and actions.

Get to Know Inna Bezborodko
Maine Trust Project: Joe Black of Bath

INSTALLMENT 14: JEAN VERMETTE

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As soon as she was comfortable in her own body, Jean Vermette found happiness.

Get to Know Jean Vermette

Maine Trust Project: Kathleen Swinbourne

INSTALLMENT 13: DANA CHANDLER

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In his line of work, trust creates community.

Get to Know Dana Chandler

Maine Trust Project: Kathleen Swinbourne

INSTALLMENT 12: JANE OGEMBO

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From Kenya to Washington County, Jane Ogembo believes her ability to trust in the basic goodness of people allows others to feel at ease with her.

Get to Know Jane Ogembo

Maine Trust Project: Kathleen Swinbourne

INSTALLMENT 11: KATHLEEN SWINBOURNE

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Topsham resident Kathleen Swinbourne resisted doing anything with and wanted to deny her psychic abilities for most of her life – until she got an enormous sign.

Get to Know Kathleen Swinbourne

Maine Trust Project: Bobby Bergeron

INSTALLMENT 10: BOBBY BERGERON

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For Bobby Bergeron, trust can depend a lot on where you live and how comfortable and confident you are with yourself.

Get to Know Bobby Bergeron

Maine Trust Project: Dona Emerson

INSTALLMENT 9: DONA EMERSON

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Dona Emerson picks up hitchhikers. Most people, especially women, have been schooled in the dangers of giving strangers a ride, and Dona was no exception. “My (85-year-old) mother,” she said, “would kill me if she knew how many I’ve picked up.”

And yet, she still does it.

Why? Because Dona Emerson understands the importance of reaching out to people to create connections, and she values the role of trust in that endeavor.

Get to Know Dona Emerson

Maine Trust Project: Deon Lyons

INSTALLMENT 8: DEON LYONS

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Deon Lyons has cancer. It’s advanced and the outlook is anything but cheery. But he’s not letting that get him down. His attitude is not surprising given one of his favorite words is “opportunity.”

“Opportunity” is a much better way of looking at what life has handed you then, say, “challenging,” which is the word most people would use to describe what he has faced over the course of his life.

Get to Know Deon Lyons

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