Maine Election 2018

A Pine Tree Watch Special Series

The Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting is taking a look at some key races in advance of Election Day, Nov. 6. Our reporting this week is on House District 2.

Centerpiece

From coughs and colds to diabetes management to emotional breakdowns, school nurses see it all. And in a largely rural state like Maine, where access to healthcare providers and services often is problematic, they’re frequently the first medical professionals students see.

School nurses play an especially pivotal role for transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) students, who, along with gay, lesbian and bisexual students, have higher rates of depression, anxiety, suicide, substance abuse, poor academic performance and self-harming behaviors than do cisgender (identifying with the sex they were assigned at birth) and heterosexual peers.

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Top Stories

ENVIRONMENT

Upstream battle

EDUCATION, PROFICIENCY-BASED LEARNING

Proficiency-based Letdown?

Maine Trust Project: Marie Harnois of Jackman

INSTALLMENT 4
Four years ago – during the “coldest December ever” – Marie Harnois found herself doing something she couldn’t have imagined before: installing hoses to collect sap from sugar maple trees.

If you didn’t count the time as a child when she’d helped a friend’s family with their 30 buckets, Marie had not run a maple sugaring business before, and yet, here she was trying to do just that – and freezing her fingers in the process.

Get to Know Marie Harnois
Maine Trust Project: Joe Black of Bath

INSTALLMENT 3
Joe Black is a man living his dream. With a light in his eyes, a quick smile and a sense of humor that invites you in, he stocks shelves and engages customers at Renys department store on Front Street in Bath. He’s been doing his dream job for more than 20 years and says it’s the perfect job for him.

“I’m a firm believer that there are different kinds of dreams,” he said. “Some people want to be rock stars. Some people … want to be president. These are big, huge dreams – and big, huge dreams are awesome – but there’s nothing wrong with little dreams.”

Get to Know Joe Black
Maine Trust Project: Joe Black of Bath

INSTALLMENT 2
Finding common ground and engaging in civil conversations about important issues facing our communities, our state, our country and our world can seem elusive, if not sadly impossible.

In our second installment of "The Maine Trust Project", we speak with Mike Douglas of Augusta, for whom trust is about wholeheartedly investing in relationships, believing he'll get out of them what he puts into them.

Get to Know Mike Douglas
Maine Trust Project: Joe Black of Bath

INSTALLMENT 1
Every day, 83-year-old Mary Betterley and her border terrier Raymond, aka, The Mayor, walk down the hill from their condo in Damariscotta to Main Street. Having lived in town for 40 years, Mary is greeting or greeted all along her way by most of those who are out and about.

Trust, for Mary, is a default position – she trusts unless given a reason not to. This attitude extends even to taking a risk with her life, as she did at age 65, when she found herself placing her toes on the edge of Kawarau Gorge Suspension Bridge at A.J. Hackett’s Bungy Centre outside Queenstown, New Zealand.

Get to Know Mary Betterley